Do I trust Politicians?

Do I trust politicians?

No!

Before undergoing a surgical procedure, it is wise to check the credentials and success rate of the surgeon. Before letting a mechanic loose on your car it is wise to check they have the qualifications to repair it. But what qualifications do we demand from politicians? Only that they look reasonably attractive and can blow their own trumpets.

Why should I trust a politician to decide on gambling laws if he/she has not studied the problem and is unaware of the ramifications? Why should I trust a politician to decide on issues such as voluntary euthanasia, abortion, gay rights… if they are religious or are influenced by the power of the religious vote?

With the present system there’s no guarantee of common sense, rationality, logic or the ability to think. If there ever was a time for allowing amateur demagogues to rule countries, that time has long gone. The problems that afflict humanity and all life on earth today are far too dire and urgent to be left to nonprofessionals who will sell their principles [if they have any] in order to win the next election.

Political decisions should be made by elderly men and women who know what they’re talking about, have a proven record of clear thinking and wise action, and no vested interests whatever in their decisions apart from the desire to hand on to their descendants a pleasantly habitable and biologically self-sustaining planet.

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2 thoughts on “Do I trust Politicians?

  1. Anthony Watts

    Just checked your blog and saw this article. ( I write as Canuk on gay authors)
    I have worked for australian and canadian politicians on both sides of the political divide and i must admit what you say you like in a politician is what they all think they are! Of course almost none are that, but honestly most truly belive that they know best.
    That said i have actually liked some of the politicians i have worked for.
    Despite some nefarious activities Graham Richardson was a great person to work for. Amanda Vanstone was bloody awful. Jocelyn Newman excellent. More recently in the NT i worked with adam giles (idiot), Alison Anderson (amazing but unpredictible) and Robyn Lambley (good small l liberal)
    Each one would have considered themselves to meet your definition of a good politician!
    I don’t know how we improve the quality. Removing their ability to effect some of the day to day running of government would be good, tho’ in a democracy it would never fly. While people love the comedy of Yes Minister/Yes Prime Minister, it also demonstrated the balance needed to run a country.
    You raise an interesting question, but i really dont know how we achieve the aim….

    Reply
    1. Rigby Post author

      I imagine this isn’t you? Anthony Watts Australian rugby league player banned for penis bite
      Thanks for commenting on my blog. I’ve jusr re-treasd it and rrealise the last word should be planet – not plan. Never mind. A Plan is also important.
      How interesting – I think – that you’ve worked closely with politicians. Are Canadians any better than Australians? I realise that politicians can be likeable – that’s how they get elected. I’m interested that everyone seemed to have great respect for Graham Richardson – He seemed to have fingers in many pies. I’m pleased you disliked Vanstone – I don’t know much about the others. I was surprised that Adam giles was not the person I hoped.
      I realise that politicians believe they know best – that’s the problem, they don’t doubt their own intellect and abilities. As the saying goes – ‘the road to hell is paved with good intentions’. Beware the man who doesn’t doubt himself. No decent person would want to be a politician in the present confrontational system. What egregious idiots they are – exemplified by the Greens in Batman – the infighting became so bad those opposed to the chosen candidate preferred to lose the seat rather than have the green candidate win.
      The solution to the dangerously inefficient current system is simple.
      1. Ban political parties.
      2. Candidates for office must swear an oath to work solely for the greater good of the nation, eschewing all other alliances.
      3. Representatives then campaign as independent individuals so the electorate knows exactly what they can expect from this person.
      4. In the chamber, the Speaker takes on the role of chairman and controls the sessions firmly.
      5. Every elected member has one vote on each issue.
      6. When a bill is introduced, it is debated on its merits according to note 2, there being no party lines, taking into consideration all independent social, fiscal and environmental advice, and once a decision is made, a spokesperson is chosen to inform the country. (It’s a version of the so-called governments of national unity that arise during times of national catastrophe)
      7. All the usual rules about conflicts of interest etc… apply.

      It is a criminal dereliction of duty that our representatives have no energy plan. No plan to reduce global warming. No plans to mitigate the effects of climate change that are already upon us. No planning to cope with the fastest population growth in the world over the next 20 years. No plans to stop the rapidly increasing gap between rich and poor. No plans for anything in fact – it’s all ad hoc and what will get a vote.
      Sorry for the diatribe.
      It can’t be that bad working for politicians if you are still doing it.
      Has it been very cold in Canada this winter? After Darwin it must be a shock, although here on the Sunshine coast our temps are still in the thirties and have been consistently hotter that Darwin all summer. Odd times. I’m glad I’m old and probably won’t live to see the big crunch.
      Rigby.

      Reply

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